Urnes style etched metal 1.5" cuff
Urnes style etched metal 1.5" cuff
Urnes style etched metal 1.5" cuff
Urnes style etched metal 1.5" cuff
  • Load image into Gallery viewer, Urnes style etched metal 1.5" cuff
  • Load image into Gallery viewer, Urnes style etched metal 1.5" cuff
  • Load image into Gallery viewer, Urnes style etched metal 1.5" cuff
  • Load image into Gallery viewer, Urnes style etched metal 1.5" cuff

Urnes style etched metal 1.5" cuff

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This listing is for a Urnes style etched metal 1.5" cuff.

At the edge of the world lies the last trace of Viking Christianity. Urnes Stave Church (c. 1130 AD) stands tall in Sognefjord in the west of Norway.

Vestiges of Norse Mythology:
In Sturluson's Poetic Edda, the World Tree played one of the most important roles in the tale. Called Yggdrasil for its relationship to Odin, the World Tree spans the entirety of the universe: its leaves reach to the very heights of heaven and its roots touch the bowels of hell. Because of its interconnectedness, it is the only thing to survive Ragnarök, and it shelters the Adam and Eve of the Norse world: Lif and Lifsandir. Urnes Stave Church represents the best surviving example of the way in which rebirth was pertinent to the imagery of the new Christian structures. These new churches are the protectors of this new religion, just as Yggdrasil protected Lif and Lifsandir.

Looking at the north portal of Urnes Staves Church, the intertwining, interwoven vines and leaves are intended to be representative of Yggdrasil. The style of the portal is the Urnes style, which developed around 1050 AD—possibly in Sweden—but takes its name from this particular church. The branches are entangled in what appears to be disarray across the portal, however this was a standard aspect of Viking and early medieval art, more identifiable as Yggdrasil by the creature in the lower left corner. The Urnes technique is categorized by stylized animals, slimly interwoven into patterns. Animals have almond shaped eyes with their heads shown in profile, and tend to be curving in an upward fashion. These techniques are evidently seen on the Urnes portal as the serpent Níðhöggr is shown with the aforementioned almond eyes tightly twisting upward.

**To learn more start here: http://www.ancient-origins.net/ancient-places-europe/urnes-stave-church-final-vestige-viking-innovation-008462

We have many additional designs available or you can request a custom design as well. Bold designs work best in a black & white format only. Please message us with any custom questions you might have so we can help you design the perfect piece according to your specifications.